Elizabeth Costello : I believe in what does not need to believe in me.──J. M. Coetzee

2012/08/31

2012年の夏 ── 今日は朝からやってるみたい


Anti-nuclear protests signal new activism in Japan



Anti-nuclear protests signal new activism in Japan    In this July 16, photo, anti-nuclear energy protesters march on a street in Tokyo.AP

TOKYO —
This is Japan’s summer of discontent. Tens of thousands of protesters—the largest demonstrations the country has seen in decades—descend on Tokyo every Friday evening to shout anti-nuclear slogans at the prime minister’s office. Many have never protested publicly before.

“I used to complain about this to my family but I realized that doesn’t do any good,” said Takeshi Tamura, a 67-year-old retired office worker. “So I came here to say this to his office. I don’t know if we can make a difference but I had to do something, and at least it’s a start.”

The government’s much-criticized handling of the Fukushima nuclear crisis has spawned a new breed of protesters in Japan. Drawn from the ranks of ordinary citizens rather than activists, they are a manifestation of a broader dissatisfaction with government and could create pressure for change in a political system that has long resisted it.

What started as relatively small protests in April has swollen rapidly since the government decided to restart two of Japan’s nuclear reactors in June, despite lingering safety fears after the meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi plant triggered by the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

As many as 20,000 people have gathered at the Friday rallies by unofficial police estimates, and organizers say the turnout has topped 100,000. Officials at the prime minister’s office say their crowd estimate is “several tens of thousands.” Either way, the two-hour demonstrations are the largest and most persistent since the 1960s, when violent student-led protests against a security alliance with the United States rocked Japan.

The protesters include office workers, families with children, young couples and retirees.

“No to restart!” they chant in unison without a break.  “No nukes!”

Despite the simple message, the anger runs much deeper, analysts say.

“It’s not only about nuclear,” says writer and social critic Karin Amamiya. “It mirrors core problems in Japanese society, and the way politics has ignored public opinion.”

Distrust of politics runs deep in Japan, and many think politicians are corrupt and only care about big business. Some voters were angered when the government rammed through a sales tax hike in July that had divided public opinion and the ruling party. The government has also done little to reduce the U.S. military presence on the southern island of Okinawa despite decades of protests there, under the security alliance that had initially triggered violent student protests.

In a country not known for mass protests, the nuclear crisis has galvanized people to an unusual extent. Unlike other issues, it cuts across ideological lines. For Japanese from all walks of life, it has shattered a sense of safety they felt about their food, the environment and the health of their children.

That helps explain why the long-standing frustration with government exploded in protests after the restart of two reactors in Ohi in Fukui Prefecture. They were the first of Japan’s 50 reactors to resume operation under a new regime of post-tsunami safety checks.

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda was criticized for making the restart decision behind closed doors and calling the weekly chanting and drum-beating outside his office “a loud noise.” An apparently chastised Noda met with rally leaders, who have proposed talks, allowing them inside his office compound for the first time Wednesday. Noda also met with leaders of Japan’s influential business lobbies afterwards.

“It’s not a loud noise that we are making. It’s desperate voices of the people,” said Misao Redwolf, an illustrator who heads the weekly protests, as she demanded Noda immediately stop the two recently resumed reactors and eventually abandon nuclear energy. “We’ll continue our protests as long as you keep ignoring our voices.”

Noda promised to listen to the people’s voices carefully before deciding Japan’s long-term energy policy, but refused to stop the two reactors.

Protest leaders said they don’t expect anything to happen just because they met Noda, but at least hold on to their hope for a change.

“All these years, lawmakers have only cared about vested interests, and that was good enough to run this country,” Kiyomi Tsujimoto, an activist-turned lawmaker, said at a recent meeting with protest organizers. “The government is still seen doing the same politics, and that’s what people are angry about. I think (the demonstrations) are testing our ability to respond to the changes.”

Masanori Oda, cultural anthropologist at Chuo University who heads a drum section of the protest, said many Japanese also contributed to prolong such a system “very convenient” to politicians by not getting angry or standing up against unfavorable policies.

“Now more Japanese are learning to raise their voice. Japanese politicians should develop a deeper sense of crisis about the situation,” Oda said.

Separately, an even larger rally, joined by rock star Ryuichi Sakamoto and Nobel laureate author Kenzaburo Oe, drew 75,000 by police estimates on July 16, a public holiday. Organizers put the crowd at Tokyo’s Yoyogi Park at nearly 200,000. Thousands also ringed Japan’s parliament after sunset on July 29 and held lit candles.

Smaller rallies have sprung up in dozens of other cities, with participants gathering outside town halls, utility companies and parks.

“Obviously, people’s political behavior is changing,” says Jiro Yamaguchi, a political science professor at Hokkaido University. “Even though a lot of people join demonstrations, that won’t bring a political change overnight. The movement may hit a plateau, and people may feel helpless along the way. But there could be a change.”

Already, there are signs of change. Many lawmakers have converted to supporting a nuclear-free future amid speculation that a struggling Noda will call an election in the coming months and that nuclear policy will be a key campaign issue.

A new party, established by veteran lawmaker Ichiro Ozawa and about 50 followers who broke away from Noda’s ruling party after opposing the sales tax hike, has promised to abolish atomic energy within 10 years. Some lawmakers have launched study groups on phasing out nuclear power. A group of prefectural, or state-level, legislators has formed an anti-nuclear green party.

The government was also forced to step up transparency about the method and results of town meetings to better reflect public views on energy policy to determine the level of Japan’s nuclear dependency by 2030. The options being considered are zero percent, 15% and 20-25%. That already delayed the energy report for several weeks, and officials set up a new panel Wednesday to discuss how to factor in public opinion in policies.

“If we carry on, we could get more people to join in the cause around the country,” said Mariko Saito, a 63-year-old homemaker from nearby Kamakura city, who joined the protest outside the prime minister’s office on a recent Friday. “I’ll definitely vote for an anti-nuclear candidate. Their nuclear stance would be the first thing I’ll look at.”

The rallies are peaceful compared to the 1960s, when activists wearing helmets and carrying clubs threw stones and burst into the parliament complex. One died and dozens were injured.

Today’s protesters hold flowers or handmade posters and even chat with police officers.

“It’s almost like a festival,” journalist and TV talk show host Soichiro Tahara wrote in his blog. “The people have finally found a common theme to come together.”
Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

2012/08/27

グリーンポイントで波しぶきをあびて走る

あまりの暑さ。もうやけになって、ケープタウンはグリーンポイントの遊歩道が、ざんぶりと波をかぶる写真を借りてこよう。
 プロムナードを走る人たちが波しぶきでずぶ濡れ。


 グリーンポイントは、『マイケル・K』で、主人公マイケルが手づくりの手押し車に母親をのせて散歩に連れ出し、歩いてみたシーポイントの遊歩道からすぐのところだ。あれは 7月。やっぱり冬。
 
 でもこの写真は2月。だから夏だ。走っている人たちは半そで姿。きゃーっ! とかいって、楽しそうだな。
 撮影は:Gordon Richardsonさん。

2012/08/25

激しい風と波にあらわれるケープタウンの港

早くお届けしたい。ゾーイ・ウィカムの『デイヴィッドの物語』。熱暑の東京で、ただいまゲラ読みの真っ最中。連日、30度をこす暑さのなかで、机に向かう。もちろんクーラーなし。

 昨年の日記をみると、8月上旬が暑かった。でも20日すぎは、すとんと気温がさがって、あまり暑さ負けせずに、『デイヴィッド』の翻訳を最終行までたどりつくことができた。あれからもう一年も・・・とわれながら驚く。その間、11月にはケープタウンまで行って、あちこちまわって、ケープマレー料理なんかも食べて、まあ、それがいまこうして読んでいるゲラに中身をあたえているとも言えるわけだけれど。


そのケープタウンはいま真冬だ。涼しげな、というか、激しい風と波にあらわれる港の写真をここにのせて、涼をとることにしよう。

(写真は、Abbey Manor というゲストハウスのサイトから借用しました。)

2012/08/22

アフンルパル通信 13

しばらく前にいただいた「アフンルパル通信 13」は、太い樹木の根元部分が大写しになった写真が表紙に使われている。東松照明の写真が圧倒的な存在感だ。

 写真、詩、文章を寄せているのは次の方々。
 
 東松照明
 管啓次郎
 鵜飼哲
 吉増剛造
 宇波彰
 宇田川洋
 小川基
 山田航

 圧倒的な「ますらお」ぶり、である。小川基の散文詩のようなことばが心にしみた。がんばれ、アフンルパル! 発行は書肆吉成。1部/500円。連絡先はこちらです。

2012/08/20

ゾーイ・ウィカムとトランスローカル

9月13日と14日にイギリスのヨーク大学で、Zoë Wicomb and Translocal:Scotland and South Africa という面白そうな催しが開かれる。基調講演はドロシー・ドライヴァー(アデレード大学)。主催者に、デレク・アトリッジ、デイヴィッド・アトウェル(いずれもヨーク大学)、カイ・イーストン(SOAS)、メグ・サミュエルスン(ステレンボッシュ大学)の名がならんでいる。朗読会に出る面々が、エレケ・ブーマー、ブライアン・チクワヴァ、J. M. クッツェー、パトリック・フラナリーなどなど。

 あらまあ、5月にアトリッジ氏がいっていたのはこの会のことか、と思いながら、ウィカムの長編『デイヴィッドの物語』のゲラ読みで忙しいわたしは、行きたいなあ、と思うだけで、とてもヨークまで飛んで行く余裕はない。
 先日もウィカムさんとのメールのやりとりで、「なんで来ないの?」といわんばかりの(笑)メールをもらったけれど、まあ、やっぱりイングランドは、ちょっとサッポロへ行ってくるといった距離じゃないわねえ、と遠くからながめやる。

 この会は、いってみればゾーイ・ウィカムをめぐって、南アフリカ/南部アフリカのエクスパトリオット文学者たちが多く集って旧交を温める会のようにも見える。そのタイトルも「スコットランドとトランスローカル」だ。
 この「トランスローカル」というのが面白い。中心となる(なってきた)文化的な大都市、都会からちょっとはずれた、かなりはずれた都市で生きている人たち──ウィカムさんが1994年から住んでいるスコットランドのグラスゴーというのも英国のなかではローカルな場所だし、ドライヴァーさんが住んでいるオーストラリアのアデレードもまちがいなく地方都市だよねえ──のあいだで、はて、どんな話が展開されるのだろう? 

2012/08/17

「あなたの意見にわたしは反対する。でも・・・」

「あなたの意見にわたしは反対する。でも、あなたがその意見を言う自由をわたしは命をかけてまもる」というようなことを言ったのがヴォルテールだというのを最近どこかで読んだ。

「というようなこと」とか「どこかで」とか、あいまいなこと限りないけれど、別に原典にあたって忠実に訳さなくてもいいか、と思うところがいまのわたしにはある。

というのは、つまるところこれは、1976年のソウェト蜂起の年に結婚という人間関係のなかに入ってから今日にいたるまで、わたしが身にしみて学び、そして試行錯誤しながら実践してきた最も大きな仕事のひとつだったように思うからだ。長い道のりだった。

そしてこの「あなた」と「わたし」の性差がなくなる山の向こうまで、行けるか、どうか。La lutte continue!!

2012/08/13

「クレア」と「ミセス」に『明日は遠すぎて』が

少し前ですが、雑誌「クレア」に『明日は遠すぎて』の書評が載りました。評者は今村楯夫さん。「最初の1行から私はアディーチェの世界に引き込まれ、気がついてみたら9編すべての短編を読み負えていた」という書き出して、作品を紹介してくださいました。Muchas gracias!

最近では、あの「ミセス」に「今月の本」として取りあげられました。「著者を彷彿とさせる生命力あふれる、若々しい聡明な女性が、どの短編にも登場する。そしてそこに描かれたナイジェリアの風景の美しいこと!」と書いてくださったのは、作家の野中柊さんです。ふたたびの Muchas gracias! です。

こんな嬉しい評を聞くと、暑い夏もなんのそのです!

2012/08/06

ロス・アラモスでハンストをする人

この映像は一見の価値あり。ニューメキシコ州のロス・アラモスで(1994-5年にサンタフェに行ったとき、横を車で通り過ぎたことがあったっけ)、この7月24日からハンストをしている男性です。「敵なんかいない!」という第一声が心に響きます。



ついでに、こちらの電子書籍も気になります。立ち読みしました。買おうかな、どうしようかな。840円というのもお手頃だし。とにかく、世界が原爆を手にしたいきさつ=歴史が分かる。それに関わった人たちの証言集だもの。

ヒロシマ・ナガサキのまえにーオッペンハイマーと原子爆弾 

2012/08/05

豊満な姿のダフネ

湿った空気が、強い夏の光のなかで少しずつ軽くなって、微風が窓から吹き込む。そんな今日の朝は、気温は高くても気持ちがよかった。湿気が大の苦手なわたしには、好ましい東京の夏。

  まぶしい光のなかで、ローレルの木がずいぶん大きくなったことにあらためて気づいた。そこでぱちりと写真を撮った。7年前の春に丈1メートルほどの、根元が二股に分かれた若木を移植したとき、周囲の樹木の陰になってあまり陽があたらなかった。するとそのうちの1本がみるみる丈を伸ばして、てっぺんばかりがひょろりと長い姿になった。ところが、それから数年のあいだに、根元の樹皮を草刈りの刃でやられたもう1本のほうがつぎつぎに脇枝を伸ばして、いまではこんもり茂る樹影を形づくっている。

アポロンに揶揄されたエロスが放った矢のおかげで、アポロンはひたすらダフネを追いかけ、ダフネはひたすらそれから逃げようとする。父である川の神によって、すんでのところで月桂樹に姿を変えたダフネ。というのがギリシア神話の月桂樹にまつわる物語である。以来アポロンはいつも月桂樹を身にまとうことになったとか。

毎年4月にちいさな花をつけ、秋には黒い実もつけるこの月桂樹。いまではまちがいなく豊満なダフネの似姿といってよさそうだ。

2012/08/01

真夏に訳す『サマータイム』

クッツェーの『Scenes from Provincial Life』の第三部『サマータイム』を訳している。今日は「アドリアーナ」の章を訳了した。これが傑作。少しだけお話のお裾分けを。

この章でインタビューを受けるアドリアーナは、ブラジル生まれのプロのダンサー。軍政下で監獄に入れられた夫といっしょにアンゴラに逃げる。夫はそこの新聞社で働いていたが、またまた非常事態宣言のために新聞社は潰され、夫自身も徴兵されそうになり、2人の娘ともどもケープタウン行きの船に乗る。1973年のことだ。そこでようやく警備員の仕事を見つけた夫は、倉庫の夜勤中に斧をもった強盗に襲われて昏睡状態に。

しかたなく、まだ十代後半の上の娘は学校をやめてスーパーで働き、下の娘を修道会の女子校へ通わせるため母親もダンス・スタジオでラテン・ダンスを教える。

この母親アドリアーナ、小柄ながらすごい美人である。母親の血を受け継いだ下の娘が通う学校の、英語の補修授業を担当していたのが、いまはなき「偉大な作家」ジョン・クッツェーだ。もちろんまだ無名時代である。このラテン系美人、アドリアーナに一方的にのぼせあがった若きクッツェー、というのが話の内容なのだ。

いまはブラジルのサンパウロに住み、「ダンサーの呪い」で腰を傷めて杖をついている身だけれど、とにかく、まあ、そのアドリアーナのナラティヴの生きのいいこと、面白いこと、可笑しいこと。生まれながらにダンスの不得手なジョン・クッツェーのことを「木偶人形」と言ってのける小気味よさ。含みをもった彼女のことばの説得力のあること!

もちろん、この女性は作者クッツェーのつくった人物だというところがみそ。そうそう、あの『フォー』の主人公スーザン・バートンの元モデルだったということにもなっている。訳書が出るのはたぶん来年かな、お楽しみに!